• Featured book: Roger Waldinger's edited volume, A Century of Transnationalism: Immigrants and their Home Connections (with Nancy L. Green)
    The burgeoning literature on immigrant transnationalism is one of the academic success stories of our times. Yet having reminded scholars that migrants, in leaving home for a new life abroad, inevitably tie place of origin and destination together, scholars of transnationalism have also insisted that today's cross-border connections are unprecedented. This collection of articles by sociologically minded historians and historically minded sociologists takes aim at that contention. Looking back over the past century and more, the book highlights both the long-term persistence and the continuing instability of home country connections. More...

  • Featured book: Ruben Hernandez-Leon's book, Skills of the "Unskilled": Work and Mobility among Mexican Migrants (with Jacqueline Hagan and Jean-Luc Demonsant)
    Most labor and migration studies classify migrants with limited formal education or credentials as “unskilled.” Despite the value of migrants' work experiences and the substantial technical and interpersonal skills developed throughout their lives, the labor-market contributions of these migrants are often overlooked and their mobility pathways poorly understood. Skills of the “Unskilled” reports the findings of a five-year study that draws on research including interviews with 320 Mexican migrants and return migrants in North Carolina and Guanajuato, Mexico. The authors uncover these migrants’ lifelong human capital and identify mobility pathways associated with the acquisition and transfer of skills across the migratory circuit, including reskilling, occupational mobility, job jumping, and entrepreneurship. More...

  • Featured book: Lorrie Frasure-Yokley's book, Racial and Ethnic Politics in American Suburbs
    Racial and Ethnic Politics in American Suburbs examines racial and ethnic politics outside traditional urban contexts and questions the standard theories we use to understand mobility and government responses to rapid demographic change and political demands. This study moves beyond traditional scholarship in urban politics, departing from the persistent treatment of racial dynamics in terms of a simple black-white binary. Combining an interdisciplinary, multi-method, and multiracial approach with a well-integrated analysis of multiple forms of data including focus groups, in-depth interviews, and census data, Racial and Ethnic Politics in American Suburbs explains how redistributive policies and programs are developed and implemented at the local level to assist immigrants, racial/ethnic minorities, and low-income groups - something that given earlier knowledge and theorizing should rarely happen. Lorrie Frasure-Yokley relies on the framework of suburban institutional interdependency (SII), which presents a new way of thinking systematically about local politics within the context of suburban political institutions in the United States today. More...

  • Featured book: Marjorie Faulstich Orellana's book, Immigrant Children in Transcultural Spaces: Language, Learning and Love
    Immigrant Children in Transcultural Spaces speaks to critical social issues and debates about education, immigration, multilingualism and multiculturalism in an historical moment in which borders are being built up, torn down, debated and recreated, in both real and symbolic terms; raises questions about the values that drive educational practice and decision-making; and suggests alternatives to the status quo. At its heart, it is a book about how love can serve as a driving force to connect people with each other across all kinds of borders, and to motivate children to engage powerfully with learning and life. More...

  • Featured book: Carola Suarez-Orozco's edited volume, Transitions: The Development of Children of Immigrants (with Mona M. Abo-Zena and Amy K. Marks)
    How are immigrant children like all other children, and how are they unique? What challenges as well as what opportunities do their circumstances present for their development? What characteristics are they likely to share because they have immigrant parents, and what characteristics are unique to specific groups of origin? How are children of first-generation immigrants different from those of second-generation immigrants? Transitions offers comprehensive coverage of the field’s best scholarship on the development of immigrant children, providing an overview of what the field needs to know—or at least systematically begin to ask—about the immigrant child and adolescent from a developmental perspective. More...

  • Featured book: Min Zhou's book, The Asian American Achievement Paradox (with Jennifer Lee)
    Asian Americans are often stereotyped as the “model minority.” Their sizeable presence at elite universities and high household incomes have helped construct the narrative of Asian American “exceptionalism.” While many scholars and activists characterize this as a myth, pundits claim that Asian Americans’ educational attainment is the result of unique cultural values. In The Asian American Achievement Paradox, sociologists Jennifer Lee and Min Zhou offer a compelling account of the academic achievement of the children of Asian immigrants… While pundits ascribe Asian American success to the assumed superior traits intrinsic to Asian culture, Lee and Zhou show how historical, cultural, and institutional elements work together to confer advantages to specific populations. An insightful counter to notions of culture based on stereotypes, The Asian American Achievement Paradox offers a deft and nuanced understanding of how and why certain immigrant groups succeed. More...

  • Featured book: Roger Waldinger's book, The Cross-Border Connection: Immigrants, Emigrants, and Their Homelands
    International migration presents the human face of globalization, with consequences that make headlines throughout the world. The Cross-Border Connection addresses a paradox at the core of this phenomenon: emigrants departing one society become immigrants in another, tying those two societies together in a variety of ways. In nontechnical language, Roger Waldinger explains how interconnections between place of origin and destination are built and maintained and why they eventually fall apart. …Although widely studied, cross-border connections remain misunderstood, both by scholars convinced that globalization is leading to a deterritorialized world of unbounded loyalties and flows, and by policy makers trying to turn migration into an engine of development. Not since Oscar Handlin’s classic The Uprooted has there been such a precisely argued, nuanced study of the immigrant experience. More...


Mediterranean migration crisis

C-SPAN coverage of May 23rd discussion with Gregory Maniatis, Senior European Policy Fellow, Migration Policy

Middle Eastern refugee crisis and global migration

C-SPAN coverage of May 23rd panel discussion with Laurie Brand, David Fitzgerald and Stefan Biedermann,

UCLA, Sciences-Po Collaboration at International Migration Graduate Student Workshop

At an event in late October, graduate students from the U.S. and France presented their

UCLA International Institute launches Center for the Study of International Migration

The new center supersedes the Institute's Program on International Migration and is directed by UCLA

Upcoming Events

The Global Refugee Crisis: A View From the Ground

October 26, 2016
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
Haines Hall 118


Miroslava Chávez-García on "Migrant Longing and Letter Writing in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands." 10/07/16 12:00.

"Migrant Longing and Letter Writing in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands"

Presentation of special issue of Mexican Studies/Estudios Mexicanos on Contemporary Return Migration from the United States to Mexico-Focus on Children, Youth, Families and Schools. 9/23/16 1:45.

Special issue of Mexican Studies/Estudios Mexicanos

➢ Syllabi

➢ Working Papers

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