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Where Religions Collide: Narrating the Conquest of Mexico from Spanish and Aztec Accounts

Harvard Divinity School Professor Davíd Carrasco uses Spanish and Aztec eyewitness accounts to describe and interpret the religious dimensions of the "Conquest of Mexico."

Tuesday, April 26, 2011
3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Ackerman Union
2nd Floor Lounge

This illustrated lecture uses Spanish and Aztec eyewitness accounts to describe and interpret the religious dimensions of the Spanish and Aztec ‘encuentro’ known as the ‘Conquest of Mexico’. Utilizing Bernal Diaz del Castillo’s memoir of Hernan Cortes’ assault on Moctezuma’s Mexico as a starting point, Carrasco will show how religious attitudes, cosmovision and practices played crucial roles in the ritual exchanges and military events that led to the formation of the Americas at the beginning of the modern era.

Davíd Carrasco is a Mexican American historian of religions with a particular interest in religious dimensions in human experience, Mesoamerican cities as symbols, immigration, and the Mexican-American borderlands. Working with Mexican archaeologists, he has carried out 20 years of research in the excavations and archives associated with the sites of Teotihuacan and Mexico-Tenochtitlan. His most recent publication is a new abridgement of Bernal Díaz del Castillo’s
memoir of the conquest of Mexico, History of the Conquest of New Spain (University of New Mexico Press). Carrasco has received the Mexican Order of the Aztec Eagle, the highest honor the Mexican government gives to a foreign national.


Cost : Free and open to the public.


Download file: carrascoWhereReligionsCollide-vo-fvp.pdf

Sponsor(s): Latin American Institute, Center for Mexican Studies, Department of History, Cesar E. Chavez Center for Interdisciplinary Instruction in Chicana and Chicano Studies, Chicano Studies Research Center, CSU Northridge Department of Religous Studies

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