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Remaking Chinese Cinema: Through the Prism of Shanghai, Hong Kong and Hollywood

A book talk by Yiman Wang, Assistant Professor of Film & Digital Media at UC Santa Cruz

Thursday, May 09, 2013
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM
Bunche Hall 10367

The talk is based on Wang's recently published book, Remaking Chinese Cinema: Through the Prism of Shanghai, Hong Kong and Hollywood. In the talk, Wang will specifically focus on the process of "foreignizing translation" (Lawrence Venuti) and its ramifications for imagining a national and regional cinema, as well as the correlated  collective subject position. Wang posits the notion of "trans" as an intractable zone of contact where jarring differences are deliberately maintained rather than massaged into wish-washy "hybridity".  It is the "trans" zone that "foreignizing translation" is staged with far-reaching ramifications.  Wang's argument is based on the analysis of the genre of "Western costume Cantonese opera film " (xizhuang ju) made in Shanghai in the 1930s and in Hong Kong in the 1950s -- both deriving from Hollywood fantastic musicals made the cusp of the the talkie era. By studying "foreignizing translation" in the mid-century Sino-American filmic interactions, Wang hopes to offer a new framework for understanding the cross-Pacific film and media exchange in the present day.

Yiman Wang is an Assistant Professor of Film & Digital Media at University of California, Santa Cruz. She received her Ph.D. from Duke University. She is the author of Remaking Chinese Cinema: Through the Prism of Shanghai, Hong Kong and Hollywood (Honolulu, HI: University of Hawaii Press, 2013).  Her articles have appeared in Quarterly Review of Film and Video, Film Quarterly, Camera Obscura, Journal of Film and Video, Literature/Film Quarterly, Positions: East Asia Cultures Critique, Journal of Chinese Cinemas, Chinese Films in Focus (Chris Berry ed. 2003, 2008), Idols of Modernity: Movie Stars of the 1920s (Patrice Petro ed. 2010), The New Chinese Documentary Film Movement: For the Public Record (Chris Berry, Lü Xinyu, and Lisa Rofel eds. 2010), Cinema at the Citys Edge: Film and Urban Networks in East Asia (Yomi Braester and James Tweedie eds. 2010), and Engendering Cinema: Chinese Women Filmmakers Inside and Outside China (Lingzhen Wang ed. 2011).


Book link: http://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/p-8938-9780824836078.aspx


Sponsor(s): Center for Chinese Studies

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